Comic #226

June 4, 2017

face it
Hi here’s a new comic finally..! Enjoy, thanks for your patience, and thanks as always for reading– it’s my honor, and i hope this measures up despite the wait.

-Wr

57 Responses to “Comic #226”

  1. phyzome Says:

    That was stunning, WR. 🙂

  2. Leopold Says:

    Holy Hashut my nigga.

    Incredible, I have no words to describe how flawlessly that was executed.

  3. candleinabox Says:

    This was absolutely beautiful. I saw the email from Patreon in my inbox last night but fell asleep before I could read it. Luckily you facebook post was an excellent reminder 😀 Somehow you always seem to write a comic that I can relate to – sometimes I wonder if I’ve written these comics myself! Although you put things into fantastic words and images that I never could.

    I hope that the people in the comic are ok. But I guess even if they are not… at least they were together. I really love this apocalypse style story, I am so intrigued as to the cause and whether any other people are ok in their bunkers or houses. I love that it’s such a terrifying prospect but the two people were worried that being confined together would be the worst of it. That’s a very real human worry, and I fully identify with it haha.

    Hoping you are well 🙂


  4. might be your best one yet. Amazing.

  5. Nicholas Norman Says:

    That was amazing. I love your written voice. Thank you for that heart warming and heart wrenching story!

  6. Ross Presser Says:

    A beautiful story … and as usual, made me curse the fact that I don’t own 160000×100000 resolution monitors. 🙂 And this time it inspired me to become a Patreon. You’re worth it.

    On AMA someone asked you to define a subnormal number … here’s the definition: http://mathworld.wolfram.com/SubnormalNumber.html

  7. spattte Says:

    It is so crazy to check for these comics every few days and not notice the way the days add together. I’ve been reading your comics for what I now realize is three years and my life is richer for it. Your comics are a wonderful counterbalance to the spite and hate that the internet exposes. Thank you.

  8. icarusmiles Says:

    I admit I haven’t been watching the videos (dial up and all, yes I still live in places without the broadband…) and was very recently wondering if perhaps you’d given up on the longform comic because of them.
    I’m glad you didn’t. I brightened my laptop to brightest setting, despite it hurting on the brighter panels, to see everything.
    Thanks for your hard work and surprise comics.
    =D


  9. and here I am making Polandball comics thinking “holy shit I wish I was a tiny fraction as good as WR”

    this is an oustanding piece of art, and I love the fact that that “I love you” went unsaid yet competely implicit.

    As always, Bravo.

    -Yaddar


  10. Beautiful. And I can relate deeply. Thank you so much for this. ❤

  11. Kalle Says:

    Quite possibly your best one, and that’s saying something. Fantastic, cinematic, poetic…great great work.

  12. Internet Person Says:

    Horrible. Beautiful. You’ve always done cataclysm well.

  13. John T Says:

    excellent as always, been reading for years. don’t ever stop

  14. kzrotlnd Says:

    I didn’t get the ending. What are the white things on the floor? Where are they coming from?


    • Hi, it’s flower petals from the flower she put in the book earlier, ominously duplicating in the same manner as the tree stumps and birds earlier. Apologies if that wasn’t clear!

  15. kzrotlnd Says:

    Ooooh. No, my bad, I missed that. That makes a lot more sense, thank you 🙂


  16. You’re pushing the boundaries of lighting in comics with this one. For example, I’m amazed how well you executed the fading flashlight. You may want to recommend people to read this in dim light for full effect.

    I also loved the effort you put into the pacing, and into the little personality-tinted details like the “modern living” floor plan.

    But I did have issues with the story structure: for me, it started out to be a very exciting mystery story, and turned into a personal story in the middle or so. Only the sudden cuts away from the expository TV reports clued me in. And because I was still half-heartedly expecting the solution to a mystery, I wasn’t as emotionally involved with the actual ending as I could have been. Maybe if the surrounding event had been something that’s already established in pop culture (like nuclear war) I wouldn’t have gotten off track in the beginning.

  17. Miles Dryden Says:

    Reminds me of Signs, a story of the end of the world seen from the point of view of one family (or couple, in this case). I would love to know more about this ‘anomaly’ and how it functions, but I realize that isn’t the point. Very well done.

    I have to say I enjoy these one-shot stories more than the arc stories with recurring characters but it’s always nice to see you post anything. Keep up the great work.


  18. Amazing comic!
    I got the feeling throughout that the personal story was the “real” story, while the disaster was a metaphor about struggling with depression while in a couple. How it makes you shut out the outside world, and it feels like you are trapping your partner in with you. If that was more or less the intent, think the bizarre/unexplained nature of the disaster did a great job at making it feel symbolic rather than literal, nudging you in the right direction for interpretation. I might not have been thinking about linking the two that directly if the disaster had been a more “normal” one, like a snowstorm or war etc.

  19. That Guy Says:

    So what is it? Really not interested in some ten year old girls diary.

  20. Auretus Says:

    I’m leaving this here because I don’t know of a way to contact you directly. I’ve been following your comics for years now, and though I’m not obsessed with them in a major way, I’ve always appreciated what you’re trying to do. It’s relieving to know that I’m not the only one out there who is this weird and deeply introverted, that there are other people who obsess over things others would trivialize, and trivialize things other people obsess over. These comics always seem to be deeply personal, in an allegorical sort of way; using fiction to bare truths one dares not speak of directly. I don’t know what it costs you to do this, emotionally, fiscally, or temporally, but I am so very grateful that you do. Your comics speak to me in a way that nothing else quite manages to, and I wanted to reach out, in my own awkward, rambling way, to share that sentiment with you, to let you know that there’s at least one more person out there who thinks that what you’re doing is worthwhile.

  21. maarvarq Says:

    You finally put up one I couldn’t make it through. Goodbye.


    • GOODBYE?? One strike and i’m OUT?!

    • mamagotcha Says:

      It takes maturity to move past instant gratification. It’s not WR that’s out, but maarvarq. My husband is a university professor, and there is great pressure to pass more kids and make the material easier… but sometimes, you have to work a little bit for the payoff. If one reader cannot pass their marshmallow test, it’s not the Stapuft Man’s fault.

  22. Javi meloni Says:

    When black and white have more colors than RGB. When you can loudly hear the silence and the time passing by in just a few static pictures. When you kindly carry us to the deepest hell to see the flower of love blooming in the latest possible moment… Damn WR!

    As usual….Great job. Amazing light btw.

    PD: Congratulations for people watching. Can’t wait for season 2 to come out. And please, do more comics. Keep doing what a WR does.

  23. Taylor Says:

    That was simultaneously chilling and beautiful in a way that I struggle to put into words.

    While it’s obvious the message isn’t about the anomaly itself, it really piqued my curiosity. I caught most of the Signs (the shimmering, the glowing electronics, the duplicating flower petals), but I seem to have missed the Strange-looking Sun. Was there supposed to be an example of each, or was that just a clever way to preemptively describe the last one subtly so that it would have more impact?

    Also, I really liked the more subtle details that built up the atmosphere and the way they must have been feeling, like the way the calendar vandalism got progressively more morbid.

    You do us all a wonderful service when you make these, it’s often THE defining feature of my day whenever I read a new one. ❤


    • Hi, thanks! And each symptom was sort of in there, but only kind of subtly. The wind disappearing is only hinted at in one of the filenames, and the sun is kind of alluded to in the one section with the calendars near the end.

    • Taylor Says:

      Oh you’re right! The March calendar has the Strange sun, I see it now.

  24. Hiro Says:

    Great work as always! Emotionally probably one of my favorite of your long forms. Darker and more poignant (as opposed to hopeless and depressing) than Raymond Brigg’s When the Wind Blows.


  25. Beautiful, chilling and inspiring.
    Well worth the wait.
    I’d also like to congratulate you on “People Watching” on Cracked.
    Your writing says things I”ve not been able to articulate.
    Thanks for that.


  26. Haunting and beautiful. Thank you for this!

  27. E Kemper Says:

    This is the most personally moving piece of art that I’ve encountered in months.

  28. Keulan Says:

    That was amazing. I’m left wondering about the cause of the apocalypse/disaster, but I know that wasn’t the point of the comic, and I loved reading it anyway.

  29. Laurel Black Says:

    Winston I didnt cry, but this left me with that gutted out hollow chest feeling. I’ve been reading a lot of apocalyptic Ursula K LeGuin shorts lately and this is really up there. That seems so pretentious, but still, you are doing really really incredibke work. What really wrecked me was the early panels of the neighborhood in disarray of flight, every house full of evidence of the specific way its occupants handled the run, so many little hopes abandoned. The wrecked cars and moving truck and RV, the “Goodbye Earth” sign, the backpack extension cord to the roof in some abandoned project I cant understand, the pallets… So many of your comics are about the uniqueness and sameness (ugh not saying this well) of people, the ways we are all human, all connected, 6 billion people with their own bright lives and souls living in parallel and sometimes being able to make the kind of connection the two in this story do. Your work always makes me think of the neologism “sonder”: “the realization that each random passerby is living a life as vivid and complex as your own—populated with their own ambitions, friends, routines, worries and inherited craziness—an epic story that continues invisibly around you like an anthill sprawling deep underground, with elaborate passageways to thousands of other lives that you’ll never know existed, in which you might appear only once, as an extra sipping coffee in the background, as a blur of traffic passing on the highway, as a lighted window at dusk.” You are probably one of the best writers in comics writing about humanity like this, and you usually write about its presence rather than its absence, and that– those empty empty houses, and every object in the last little house its own story– was devastating and powerful. Thanks for this.

  30. astrapto Says:

    This is a masterwork.

  31. Keith Nunn Says:

    whoa. gobsmacked.

    • Keith Nunn Says:

      That was a amazing. Once again, you tell an awesome and humanly revealing story. I confess though that my old eyes are struggling more and more with the low contrast stuff. I wonder if I might make a plea for a little more contrast. I get the vibe and it worked beautifully, but I really struggled.

  32. Diego Says:

    Thank You.

  33. illuminatus5 Says:

    I feel overwhelmed by the whole set of emotions that it’s raised in me. This may yet be your best one, Winston.

  34. Tore Nielsen Says:

    That was beautiful. Thank you.

    Sing, Subnorm, sing!
    Death is comin’ in!

  35. Jer Says:

    So much like the animation ‘When the Wind Blows (1986)’ yet a completely opposite tone, if that makes any sense.


  36. Winston, you never fail to reach me on such a deep and emotional level. This comic brought me to tears, Thank you.


  37. So what’s happening in the last panel? I see the petals spreading everywhere but I don’t know what the black space is. I’ve stared at it for a while but I just don’t know what I’m looking at

  38. Alex Says:

    Hey look I’m crying

  39. Marc J. Says:

    I finally got around to reading this yesterday, and damn was it worth the wait! This was *masterful*, and an amazing experience, like all of your long-form comics have been to me. You really manage to create an engulfing atmosphere that I enjoy sinking into.

  40. Johanne Says:

    I am

    crushed

  41. Alex S Says:

    I’ve been reading your work for what must easily be a straight ten years now. This is the most heartbreakingly beautiful thing you’ve done.

    Such a triumph. If this doesn’t win a webcomic of the year award of some sort, I’ll be very surprised.

    Wonderful.

  42. Mark Says:

    Entire sections of this story aren’t visible on my system because it says they contain errors. Help!

  43. Lance Adams Says:

    This is an amazing, fantastic work of creation! I am not often a fan of graphic novels because I feel like they sacrifice story for art, or action. The darkness that caused me to strain, the separate narratives both verbally and visually, so many things are just magnificently done here. And the overall effect is powerful for its message, its voice and its execution!!! Thank you so much for this work. I’m going to be looking for more.

  44. Barney R.P. Schroeder Says:

    I read this when it was featured on Reddit for god-knows-how-long ago. Then I saw that this was number 226 and realized that there must be a goldmine of greatness waiting to be read and… well…

    I feel like a changed person after reading everything. To try and think in the way of your characters is mindblowing and following their journey from the beginning till now is… indescribable. Winston, I am proud to say that you are a God. Damn. Hero for doing what you do.

    Granted, I was not in a depressed state, nor had i really needed this to live my life properly. But what you have gifted to me, is an urge to do more with my life, and to do something about that feeling of wanting to be an inspiration to others and just be a beam of light in peoples lives.

    I have cried at several of your comics, I have probably laughed at more and every single one of them left things I pondered over after I read them. You have really made me think and I could not be more grateful for that.

    From the bottom of my heart, and probably many times more then that.

    Thank You. So much.

    And i will be tuning in for the next many more you do 🙂

    Sincerely, Barney

    P.S. Love the walls of text 😉

  45. X Says:

    To me this is a nanobot swarm. It makes sense to me with the too many of any thing, and the glow of the electronics is draining power from then ect not sure about the odd sun although. Thanks I loved this one.


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